Coronavirus photo diary week three: 29 March - 4 April

Another down day was Sunday 29th March.

The weather turned and it was freezing cold, which only added to the gloom. 

On a brief trip to get some supplies, I saw this, which made me shudder - 

It really does feel as if the party is over... for now, at least. 

 

A good run on Monday 30th March made me feel better.

But, out at West Cambridge, a major University development site, I saw something which made me stop in a flicker of memory and irony...

The silent, static cranes reminded me of the tripods at the end of the War of the Worlds, when the Martians have been slain by humble earthly bacteria. 

In fiction, the bugs came to our rescue. But today, in the harsh new world of coronavirus fact...

 

Bless the British. 

Saw this outside Waitrose in central Cambridge on Tuesday, 31st March, and I just had to admire it - 

Not just a queue, but a perfectly socially distanced queue.

It seems we are adapting to these strange new times in our supremely stoic way.

 

Speaking of which, here's an example of a potential positive when we're through all this...

Above, Victoria Avenue, a usually busy Cambridge road, but now... 

Perhaps people will drive less in the days after the virus, meaning less pollution, less noise, and less blight on our cities. 

This was Weds, 1st April -

And with the coronavirus death toll rising by the hour - up by more than 500 in the UK today - what it's doing to our world remains very far from being an April Fool joke. 

 

Music and melancholy on Thursday 2nd April.

I was walking through Christ's Pieces, a park in central Cambridge, and came upon a busker...

I sat and listened for ten minutes, as he was good. But in that time, maybe two or three people passed by. 

And I'd brought no money to give him, either. 

These are hard times for just about all sectors of the economy - buskers included. 

 

Friday 3rd April, and another forlorn sight - 

This is Jesus Green, a famous, and usually very popular walk with that elegant line of trees. But with the time nearing noon...

No one. 

Sad to say that coronavirus has made the world a much lonelier place. 

 

Weekends are particularly poignant in the lockdown.

Times when you look forward to being able to go out, shop, have a drink, meet friends…

And now those simple pleasures, which you once took for granted, are no longer fixtures of your life.

But I’ve never been a believer in sitting around and feeling sorry for yourself, so found solace in a simple, yet sadly often overlooked pleasure.

Nature, and particularly her beauty in springtime.

Like the renaissance of flora, in a Cambridge Park, above…

And as a special treat, the fauna too - 

This peacock of a delight fluttered down during a cycle ride outside the city, my sole authorised exercise of the day.  

This was Saturday 4th April.